Boston mayoral candidate Martin Walsh, long a fighter for unions, talks of striking a broader balance

Martin Walsh spent two years as a laborer, and then worked his way through union ranks.
Martin Walsh spent two years as a laborer, and then worked his way through union ranks.Credit: Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

When Martin J. Walsh got his union card in 1988, he essentially entered the family business. Laborers Local 223 counted his father as a member. It was led by his uncle. His cousin, Martin F. Walsh, now runs the union. Another cousin is the office manager.

Walsh himself only worked on the back-breaking side of the union for two years, hauling rocks and filling dumpsters, before taking a series of increasingly prominent desk jobs that culminated in a $175,000-a-year job as the head of the city’s largest building trades group.

During his 25 years as a union man, Walsh rose to become one of the key figures in Boston’s construction industry, a politically-connected labor leader who understood how to usher a project past neighborhood opposition, secure state financing, and keep the peace with developers.

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Share