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The real world

Teens say they're reading urban fiction because it reflects life in the city. Should parents be concerned?

Chanel Cowan-Cummings (left) and Breanna Blocker enjoy urban fiction. Debate has arisen over the depiction of sex, violence, and drug use in the novels. Chanel Cowan-Cummings (left) and Breanna Blocker enjoy urban fiction. Debate has arisen over the depiction of sex, violence, and drug use in the novels. (Yoon S. Byun/Globe Staff)
By Vanessa E. Jones
Globe Staff / November 3, 2008

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Kymaunii Godfrey, Breanna Blocker, and Chanel Cowan-Cummings talk spiritedly about the types of books they like to read. Cowan-Cummings, a freshman at Melrose High School, says she finds most of the literature she peruses for class "boring." Blocker is suspicious of books created specifically for young adults. (Full article: 1182 words)

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