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Exploring the power of the stories we tell ourselves

(gus wezerek/globe staff)
By Troy Jollimore
November 27, 2011
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Common sense has a lot to say about human behavior and the human brain. Recent empirical research, though, strongly suggests that a good deal of what it has to say is wrong. This is both unfortunate and serious, since the many of the practices and policies we choose as a society are based on our beliefs about human behavior and how to change it. Two new books from eminent brain researchers aim to apply these recent findings to questions of behavior, free will, and responsibility.

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REDIRECT: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change By Timothy D. Wilson

Little, Brown, 288 pp., $25.99

WHO”S IN CHARGE?: Free Will and the Science of the Brain Michael S. Gazzaniga

Ecco, 26p pp., $27.99