Entertainment

James Cameron knows how the Malaysia Airlines plane can be found

Director James Cameron poses for a portrait in Manhattan Beach, California April 8, 2014. Cameron, best known as director of blockbuster films "Titanic" and "Avatar", has appealed to well-known Hollywood actors to act as correspondents for new Showtime documentary "Years of Living Dangerously", which chronicles the human impact on the global climate and the consequences for humans of climate change. Picture taken April 8, 2014. To match story TELEVISION-CLIMATECHANGE/ REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT ENVIRONMENT PROFILE PORTRAIT)
Director James Cameron poses for a portrait in Manhattan Beach, Calif.REUTERS

Movie director James Cameron says he knows how the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 can be found.

In a Reddit AMA today he said, in some detail, that success depends on if the pings being investigated in the Indian Ocean are in fact from the missing plane.

They'll triangulate the acoustic data that they have so far, and they'll generate what's called a search box. I don't know how big that will be, but it might be 25-30 miles on a side, it might be a very large piece of ocean. Then there are a suite of tools that can operate at the kind of depth we're talking about, I believe between 4,000-5,000 meters. My ultra-deep submersible would not be required at those levels, that's half of the level it's designed for.

Advertisement—Continue Reading Below

Cameron, the man behind “Avatar,” “Aliens,” and “Titanic,” described himself as a “deep-sea explorer and dedicated environmentalist.”

With credentials like that, it was not hard for the writer, director, producer to expand on his jet-finding plan.

The next step would be to use an AUV, an autonomous underwater vehicle, and have it run at 400 or 500 feet above the bottom and do a sonar profile of the bottom, it does that by running a search pattern, kind of like mowing the lawn. That takes days or weeks to do. Then you analyze any signatures that are anomalous, that don't look like flat bottom, and you say are those rocks, is that geology or does that look like the piece of an aircraft? And then once you have those targets, you know where they are on the bottom, then you go back, either with that type of vehicle or an ROV (a remotely operated vehicle) that would be hanging down from a ship on a cable. And you'd take a look essentially with a videocamera. And then you'd be able to identify whether that target was in fact the aircraft you are looking for.

Cameron isn’t the only person from the entertainment world to offer their help in the search. Last month, Hole rocker Courtney Love pointed us all to what looked like debris.

When tragedy strikes, stars aren’t far away. You haven’t forgotten about Kevin Costner’s invention to clean up the 2010 Gulf oil spill have you?

Of course, Cameron did put that pretty big qualifier on his plan.

It all hinges on whether or not those pings are actually from the black box, and not from something else, like a scientific instrument that's drifted off course or whatever.

Share