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Natalia Vodianova is not hungry anymore

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natalia.jpgModeling is a glamorous gig, but it can also be harmful to your health, says Natalia Vodianova. The Russian-born beauty, whose face and figure have been used to sell Calvin Klein, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Jacobs, says she used to be a scrawny mess, down to just 106 pounds and losing her hair. “It just sort of happened to me without me knowing it,” Vodianova told us yesterday. “My weight was never an issue before I started modeling.” The consequences of the catwalk are the subject of next week’s “Health Matters: Weight and Wellness in the World of Fashion,” sponsored by the Harris Center at Mass. General. (Vodianova will be joined on the panel by high falutin fashion designer Michael Kors and Vogue’s Anna Wintour.) Reached yesterday in London, where she lives with her husband and three children, Vodianova said many girls begin modeling at a very young age – 15 and 16 – and then try to maintain that same slender look as they develop. “To be a model is a gift that you are born with. Not everyone is meant to look like that,” she says. “The industry should employ women who are mature. Don’t put a delicate flower into this world of great disorder and then throw them out.” Asked about the gold standard of supermodels, Gisele Bundchen, Vodianova called Tom Brady’s bride a consummate pro. “She hardly drinks, doesn't smoke, and does not party. Gisele is very smart and treats modeling as a business, not a lifestyle,” said Vodianova. Registration for the March 22 event closes today, and we’re told it’s already at capacity. But there are still a few tickets – at $500 a piece – for the reception beforehand. (Ticket info is here.) In addition to the panelists, VIPs who have RSVP’d include Steve and Jill Karp, Rue La La’s Ben Fischman, Eliot Tatelman of Jordan’s Furniture, hotelier Dick Friedman, WBUR’s Paul LaCamera, liquor store magnate Carl Martignetti, and Steven Kolb of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.  

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This blog features the latest local and national celebrity news from The Boston Globe's Names column team. Check back for the latest updates.
Mark Shanahan joined The Boston Globe in 2003, having worked previously at the Portland Press Herald, where he covered City Hall, and the Lewiston Sun-Journal, where he was the education reporter. A Northampton native and graduate of Bates College, Shanahan enjoys the usual - books, music, movies, etc. - as well as the unusual.
shanahan@globe.com
Follow on Twitter: @GlobeNames, @MarkAShanahan
Meredith Goldstein has worked for the Globe since 2003, covering everything from nightlife to New Kids. She keeps her eyes peeled for celebrity juice, and also writes Love Letters, a Boston.com blog for hopeful (and hopeless) romantics. Meredith chats about love problems every Wednesday at 1 p.m. If you see Justin Timberlake or someone like him at a local eatery, please e-mail her immediately. mgoldstein@globe.com
Follow on Twitter: @GlobeNames, @MeredithGoldste

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