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Your backstage pass to Aerosmith and J. Geils at Fenway

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 tylerfen.jpgCurious why Aerosmith and J. Geils didn’t do a tune together at Fenway? It might have to do with a last-minute feud between the bands’ famously demanding frontmen Steven Tyler and Peter Wolf.

 We’re told Tyler didn’t want Wolf to use the ramp that extended into the audience, and told him so the night before the show. According to our source, the singers had a “heated argument” in the outfield as a few dozen workers put the finishing touches on the stage Friday. Needless to say, the emotions were not so sweet.
 
 “It was uncalled for and disrespectful,” said our source.

 In the end, Tyler relented, but he told Wolf to also get the OK from Joe Perry, which Wolf did.

 “Celebrating the night by having the bands play together was a wonderful fantasy,” said our guy, “but the (argument) effectively closed the door on the idea.”
 
 The Woofa Goofa walked out on the ramp several times during Geils’ set, once throwing a bouquet of roses he’d been given into the crowd. But it’s nothing personal. We’re told Aerosmith has prohibited other acts, including Sammy Hagar, from using the ramp during opening sets. Attempts to reach Tyler were unsuccessful today.

IMG00216-20100813-2049(2).jpg                                          Wolf and Tyler argue in the outfield   

 For all the dysfunction between the two bands, the vibe was not at all fraught between Tyler and his Toxic Twin, Perry, before Saturday's sold-out show. As they looked over the set list backstage, the two talked quietly and Perry strummed his guitar.
 
 "I'm going to eat Boston for dinner," Tyler told us, his hands on his skinny hips.
 
 But our favorite moment was when Perry's mother rose from her wheelchair to greet Tyler. "Oh, Mary!" exclaimed the frontman, wrapping his arms around the elderly woman before taking a seat in her wheelchair.
 
 Tyler's girlfriend, Erin Brady, was there, as was his ex-wife, Teresa, daughters Chelsea and Mia, and son Taj. Perry's wife, Billie, introduced us to the couple's two boys, Tony and BU freshman Roman, and her other son, Aaron.
 
 Perry said he's recovered from his recent motorcycle accident, but also confided it was more serious than anyone knew. "It's a miracle I'm alive," he said. "That's why I have two bikes for sale. ... I can't be doing that anymore."
 
 Asked if the band is working on a new LP, Perry said not yet.
 
 Author Stephen Davis, who wrote the band's best-selling bio, "Walk This Way," was milling around backstage, and gave Tom Hamilton's wife, Terry, a hug. "The last original Aerosmith wife," he whispered. (Davis was also overheard asking Tyler if he needs help with his long-delayed memoir, and the singer confessed he's on his fourth ghost writer.)

 Also spied in the Aerosmith tent were Curt and Shonda Schilling and the band's long-ago ax man Ray Tabano.
 
During the show, screenwriter Scott Rosenberg, a Needham native, cracked a wide smile when Aerosmith played "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing," the Diane Warren ballad from the blockbuster film "Armageddon." Rosenberg reminded us that he wrote the scene in the movie that accompanies the song - a scene critics later deemed the worst of that year.

"I'm rather proud of the distinction," he said.

 Also in the crowd were Sox CEO Larry Lucchino and wife Stacey, chairman Tom Werner, Phoenix brass Stephen and Brad Mindich and David Bieber, chefs Michael Schlow and Jason Santos, gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker, Celtic Brian Scalabrine, Bruins Mark Recchi, Tuukka Rask, and Shawn Thornton, Davio's owner Steve DiFillippo and wife Pam, Wolf's sister Nancy, Eastern Standard owner Garrett Harker, hedge fund kahuna Alex Zecca and his wife, Laura, Greatest Bar owner Billy Fairweather, band managers Mark Kates, Ralph Jaccodine, and Bert Holman, who manages the Allman Brothers Band, WUMB DJ John Laurenti, WZLX music director Carter Alan and former WBCN DJ Mark Parenteau.

 A host of hotshots were at the after-party at the House of Blues, including Johnny A, Charlie Farren, Jon Butcher, Barry Goudreau, and comedian Steve Sweeney.




About this blog

This blog features the latest local and national celebrity news from The Boston Globe's Names column team. Check back for the latest updates.
Mark Shanahan joined The Boston Globe in 2003, having worked previously at the Portland Press Herald, where he covered City Hall, and the Lewiston Sun-Journal, where he was the education reporter. A Northampton native and graduate of Bates College, Shanahan enjoys the usual - books, music, movies, etc. - as well as the unusual.
shanahan@globe.com
Follow on Twitter: @GlobeNames, @MarkAShanahan
Meredith Goldstein has worked for the Globe since 2003, covering everything from nightlife to New Kids. She keeps her eyes peeled for celebrity juice, and also writes Love Letters, a Boston.com blog for hopeful (and hopeless) romantics. Meredith chats about love problems every Wednesday at 1 p.m. If you see Justin Timberlake or someone like him at a local eatery, please e-mail her immediately. mgoldstein@globe.com
Follow on Twitter: @GlobeNames, @MeredithGoldste

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