Antiques & Collectibles

This 18th-century Chippendale chest of drawers with the label of Jacob Forster of Charlestown will be offered at Northeast Auction’s Spring Weekend Auction with a $20,000-$40,000 estimate. Expected to be the auction’s top seller, with a $90,000-$150,000 estimate, is this illustration by Grant Wood for a special edition of Sinclair Lewis’s novel “Main Street.” White marble busts by the Boston sculptor Thomas Ball have a $25,000-$35,000 estimate. At Skinner’s Fine Jewelry Auction, silver pendants made by Pablo Picasso, one depicting his son Claude, another the head of a satyr, will be offered with $15,000-$20,000 estimates.
This 18th-century Chippendale chest of drawers with the label of Jacob Forster of Charlestown will be offered at Northeast Auction’s Spring Weekend Auction with a $20,000-$40,000 estimate. Expected to be the auction’s top seller, with a $90,000-$150,000 estimate, is this illustration by Grant Wood for a special edition of Sinclair Lewis’s novel “Main Street.” White marble busts by the Boston sculptor Thomas Ball have a $25,000-$35,000 estimate. At Skinner’s Fine Jewelry Auction, silver pendants made by Pablo Picasso, one depicting his son Claude, another the head of a satyr, will be offered with $15,000-$20,000 estimates.

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

A rare 1786-90 Chippendale mahogany chest of drawers with the label of a Charlestown cabinetmaker is among the offerings at Northeast Auctions’ Spring Weekend Auction Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. at Treadwell Mansion, 93 Pleasant St., Portsmouth, N.H.

The label in the top drawer of the chest, which has a $20,000-$40,000 estimate, is printed “Jacob Forster, Cabinet Maker, Charlestown, Massachusetts.” Forster (1764-1838), a Berwick, Maine, native, apprenticed in Watertown and moved to Charlestown in 1786. It was a perfect time for a cabinetmaker to locate in Charlestown as families were returning to restore and furnish homes damaged or destroyed during the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Another rare example of 18th-century Massachusetts furniture is the circa 1760 Queen Anne walnut tray-top table that also has a $20,000-$40,000 estimate.

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Share