THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
THE TIP

Innovative meets traditional

At Remick’s, the menu features American cuisine with international influences, divided between comfort food and more elegant dishes. At Remick’s, the menu features American cuisine with international influences, divided between comfort food and more elegant dishes. (Barry Chin/Globe Staff)
By Devra First
Globe Staff / April 15, 2011

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

REMICK’S

1657 Hancock St., Quincy

617-481-1010

At the end of March, Remick’s opened in Quincy, in the space formerly occupied by restaurant/pub Finian’s. Its executive chef is Marc Orfaly, of Pigalle in the Theatre District and Marco in the North End. He has teamed with Quincy native Timothy Collins and Bob Palmer on the project. Orfaly’s entry into a new city is notable because Quincy isn’t commonly viewed as a dining destination. Perhaps Remick’s will start to change that. It ought to. On the Red Line, right off the highway, with plenty of waterfront, Quincy could be a restaurateur’s dream.

Remick’s is named for the former Quincy department store, owned by actress Lee Remick’s family. The menu features American cuisine with international influences, divided between comfort food and more elegant dishes. You’ll find everything from New England seafood chowder, ziti with chicken and broccoli, and fried oyster po’ boy sliders with kimchi to slow-roasted rib eye, crispy duckling with kumquats, and cod with bok choy, coconut rice, and curry emulsion. The restaurant roasts whole suckling pigs for parties of 10 or more; the pig is served with Caesar salad and apple pie. On Sundays, you can order a family-style dinner.

A bar/lounge features cocktails and a stage for live music. With brick walls, clean lines, and modern light fixtures and chairs, Remick’s looks sleek. But it’s comfortable, too. Nothing on the menu costs more than $20, and you can get a cheeseburger and fries for $12. But the dish that may best sum up the restaurant is a Vietnamese summer roll stuffed with corned beef, cabbage, and potato: Asian meets Irish, innovative meets traditional. It sums up Quincy, too.

Ratings

  • 4 Stars Extraordinary
  • 3 Stars Excellent
  • 2 Stars Good
  • 1 Star Fair
  • No Stars Poor