THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Threat to Globe triggers flood of feelings

Many worry, a few shrug, but most adamant that the city needs its major daily newspaper

Francis Doiron read the Globe at Breads 'n Bits of Ireland in Melrose yesterday while the Locke family ate in the background. Steven Locke said ''it'd be a tragedy if the Globe were to close,'' while his wife, Suzanne, thought about a world in which her children didn't know newspapers. Francis Doiron read the Globe at Breads 'n Bits of Ireland in Melrose yesterday while the Locke family ate in the background. Steven Locke said ''it'd be a tragedy if the Globe were to close,'' while his wife, Suzanne, thought about a world in which her children didn't know newspapers. (Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff)
By Maria Sacchetti and Eric Moskowitz
Globe Staff / April 5, 2009

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Marcus Weiss of Newton stared in shock yesterday at the newspaper that has landed on his doorstep every day for 30 years. In Woburn, Ollie Gonsalves wondered who would stick up for the "little guy.'' In Cambridge, Mike Spartichino shrugged indifferently and rushed home with a box of doughnuts. (Full article: 1701 words)

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