Lance Armstrong film went from redemption to ‘Lie’

“What made me really angry was that I realized I had been used,” says director Alex Gibney (above) about cyclist Lance Armstrong having repeatedly denied cheating.
“What made me really angry was that I realized I had been used,” says director Alex Gibney (above) about cyclist Lance Armstrong having repeatedly denied cheating.Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

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It was supposed to be a break from the dark side of humanity. Subjects that Alex Gibney had plumbed in documentaries such as “Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room” (2005) and the Oscar-winning “Taxi to the Dark Side” (2007). Gibney’s new project was supposed to be an uplifting film chronicling Lance Armstrong’s attempted comeback in the 2009 Tour de France in search of his eighth victory, and vindication from the charges of doping that had hounded his career.

But it was not to be. Just as the film, then titled “The Road Back,” neared completion, Armstrong’s decade of denial collapsed and a darker, sadder story emerged. The result would mean a different film, with the title “The Armstrong Lie.”

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