THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Movie Review

Rashomon

The brilliance of ‘Rashomon,’ in a new print

Machiko Kyo and Toshiro Mifune in “Rashomon,’’ the 1951 classic that opened the door to Asian filmmaking. Machiko Kyo and Toshiro Mifune in “Rashomon,’’ the 1951 classic that opened the door to Asian filmmaking. (Daiei/Kobal Collection)
By Ty Burr
Globe Staff / April 23, 2010

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

You can be forgiven for thinking you’ve seen “Rashomon,’’ even if you haven’t. Sixty years after its release, so completely has the “Rashomon concept’’ of subjective narrative — of a story’s truth depending on the person who’s telling it — infiltrated the culture that sitcoms no longer even use it for parody. What Akira Kurosawa and his tiny production team ... (Full article: 527 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass

Movie listings search

Movie times  Globe review archive