Bogie’s Place is a steakhouse that feels like a private party

Clockwise from above: The wedge salad at Bogie’s Place comes with blue cheese, bacon, tomatoes, and croutons; a foie gras torchon has rhubarb, pistachio, and bruleed sugar; fried clams with slaw, remoulade, and cornichons on potato bread.
Clockwise from above: The wedge salad at Bogie’s Place comes with blue cheese, bacon, tomatoes, and croutons; a foie gras torchon has rhubarb, pistachio, and bruleed sugar; fried clams with slaw, remoulade, and cornichons on potato bread.Credit: PHOTOS BY WENDY MAEDA/GLOBE STAFF

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BOGIE’S PLACE

Boston has no shortage of steakhouses, as anyone who spends time in the city knows: They tend to be big, shiny, and highly visible. They also tend to be outposts of chains headquartered elsewhere, with siblings in many major cities. They offer a consistent, reliable experience, if not an adventure. But that’s not always how we eat today, when restaurants pop up for a few days then disappear, when trucks serve sophisticated fare. So it is refreshing to stumble across the anti-steakhouse, tiny and without signage, hidden inside another restaurant altogether. Bogie’s Place is a 20-seat secret that’s part of Downtown Crossing’s jm Curley. Where jm Curley is casual, raucous, and known for burgers, Bogie’s is intimate and hushed — jm Curley all grown up.

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