Sections
Shortcuts

‘Chroma’ spins from grit to lyricism to classicism

Jeffrey Cirio (right) danced with Isaac Akiba (left) and John Lam in a  dress rehearsal of Boston Ballet’s “Chroma” playing at the Boston Opera House.
Jeffrey Cirio (right) danced with Isaac Akiba (left) and John Lam in a dress rehearsal of Boston Ballet’s “Chroma” playing at the Boston Opera House.Yoon S. Byun/Globe Staff

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

Choreographers George Balanchine and Wayne McGregor — whom the Boston Ballet brought together in its program “Chroma” Thursday night — make strange bedfellows. And it’s not because Balanchine is a classicist and McGregor is an Experimentalist, with a capital “E.”

It’s because Balanchine’s dances no matter how old have the nuances and musicality to withstand time and look new. McGregor’s, if his offering “Chroma,” made in 2006 for London’s Royal Ballet, is any indication, operate on a single high-pitched plane that dates them.

There are many in the Boston Ballet audience who would disagree with that. Indeed, I heard employees for the troupe saying during intermission that the standing ovation for “Chroma” was the longest they had ever seen. But still, the newcomer cannot hold a candle to the master.

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

“Chroma” “Serenade” and “Symphony in C”

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Sections
Shortcuts

Share