A journey through Poe’s haunted mind in his final days, with piano

Sophie Bortolussi as Virginia and Ean Sheehy as Edgar Allan Poe in “Red-Eye to Havre De Grace.”
Sophie Bortolussi as Virginia and Ean Sheehy as Edgar Allan Poe in “Red-Eye to Havre De Grace.”Credit: Johanna Austin

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

A dead man’s heart beating from beneath the floorboards. A stately raven perching ominously in a forlorn man’s study. A murderous husband betrayed by the wailing of a one-eyed cat.

The works of Edgar Allan Poe have yielded a host of indelible images, many related to the ghoulish vision of madmen and the musty creep of the supernatural. There’s also the mystery of his final days. Poe attempted to ride a train from Richmond, Va., to New York City, but along the way was spotted traveling in the wrong direction. After disappearing for several days, he died in a Baltimore hospital. “The story of his life, and especially the last two weeks, is as interesting as any of his stories — maybe even more interesting. It’s like, his own Poe story is his demise,” remarks Thaddeus Phillips, whose show “Red-Eye to Havre De Grace” offers an impressionistic tour of the writer’s last days.

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Share