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Visual Arts

Did he, or didn't he?

In 2002 Alex Matter, son of a close friend of painter Jackson Pollock, found 32 works that Matter's late father had stored in a locker, labeled as pieces by Pollock. Five years later, with the authenticity of the paintings still in question, Boston College's McMullen Museum plans to show the controversial works for the first time.

BC physics professor Andrzej Herczynski (left) and art historian Claude Cernuschi studied how the laws of physics played into Pollock's work and discuss this in the show's catalog. BC physics professor Andrzej Herczynski (left) and art historian Claude Cernuschi studied how the laws of physics played into Pollock's work and discuss this in the show's catalog. (bill greene/globe staff)
By Geoff Edgers
Globe Staff / February 18, 2007

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CHESTNUT HILL -- The tiny McMullen Museum of Art, tucked across from the admissions office in Boston College's Devlin Hall, is free to visitors and closes between shows. The nearest it has come to courting controversy in its 14-year history was a 1999 Irish art exhibition that featured a photographic portrait of an artist wearing nothing but a condom. (Full article: 1648 words)

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