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Visual Arts Review

Sculpture show of a different color

A Trojan archer is one of 20 reconstructions on display in 'Gods in Color' at Harvard's Sackler Museum. A Trojan archer is one of 20 reconstructions on display in "Gods in Color" at Harvard's Sackler Museum. (Courtesy Stiftung Archaeologie, Munich)
By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent / January 6, 2008

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CAMBRIDGE - Imagine gussying up Michelangelo's David with rosy cheeks and brown hair. It would be sacrilege. Michelangelo's concern was liberating the human form from stone. He took his cue from the sculptures of classical antiquity, which set aesthetic standards we still cherish. And they were pristine and unadorned. Right? (Full article: 1138 words)

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