THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Art Review

In vast LeWitt show, absurdity and beauty

A Minimalist and Conceptual leader, ready to please a crowd again

''Wall Drawing 1005'' (above) is part of a three-story installation at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art of works by the late Sol LeWitt. Many early works use fine pencil; later ones also use ink wash or acrylic paints in bold patterns. ''Wall Drawing 1005'' (above) is part of a three-story installation at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art of works by the late Sol LeWitt. Many early works use fine pencil; later ones also use ink wash or acrylic paints in bold patterns. (Courtesy of the Estate of Sol Lewitt (above))
By Sebastian Smee
Globe Staff / November 16, 2008

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

NORTH ADAMS - Sol LeWitt was at the forefront of two of the 20th century's most esoteric and alienating art movements, Minimalism and Conceptualism, yet he somehow managed to keep his own work as crowd-pleasing and hypoallergenic as a Goldendoodle. (Full article: 1310 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass