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Stage Review

Pointed humor

Probing race, class, gender, and family in Huntington’s sharp ‘Stick Fly’

From left: Nikkole Salter, Jason Dirden, Billy Eugene Jones, and Rosie Benton in the Huntington Theatre Company’s production of Lydia R. Diamond’s “Stick Fly.’’ From left: Nikkole Salter, Jason Dirden, Billy Eugene Jones, and Rosie Benton in the Huntington Theatre Company’s production of Lydia R. Diamond’s “Stick Fly.’’ (Scott Schuman)
By Louise Kennedy
Globe Staff / February 26, 2010

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Acutely observant, laugh-out-loud funny, achingly painful, and complicated as only real human stories can be - it’s a fine night in the theater if a play earns even one of these descriptions. To provide all of that and more, as Lydia R. Diamond’s “Stick Fly’’ does - well, that’s just cause to shout for joy. (Full article: 867 words)

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Scenes from the Huntington Theatre Company's production of "Stick Fly," written by Lydia R. Diamond and directed by Kenny Leon. (Handout video)