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Arts: the week ahead

Collage man VARUJAN BOGHOSIAN Collages from an artist best known for his assemblages of found objects. The collages, made from papers resonant with history, make sly, surreal associations. One group here, inspired by Audubon’s “Birds of America,’’ is populated with swans. Pictured: “A Swan for Marcel.’’ Through Oct. 29. Victoria Munroe Fine Art, 161 Newbury St. 617-523-0661, www.victoriamunroefineart.com Collage man

VARUJAN BOGHOSIAN Collages from an artist best known for his assemblages of found objects. The collages, made from papers resonant with history, make sly, surreal associations. One group here, inspired by Audubon’s “Birds of America,’’ is populated with swans. Pictured: “A Swan for Marcel.’’ Through Oct. 29. Victoria Munroe Fine Art, 161 Newbury St. 617-523-0661, www.victoriamunroefineart.com
(Victoria Munroe Fine Art)
October 6, 2011

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THEATER

THE FARM A taut and absorbing new drama by 27-year-old Brookline playwright Walt McGough about a spy trying to come in from the cold after something went terribly wrong on his last assignment. Through Oct. 23. Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, Boston. 866-811-4111, www.bostonplaywrights.org

TINY KUSHNER Turns out Tony Kushner doesn’t need to work on an epic scale to have a pronounced impact, and neither does David J. Miller’s excellent cast of four in this production of five one-act plays by the man whose place is secure on any list of America’s greatest living playwrights. Through Oct. 22. Presented by Zeitgeist Stage Company. At Plaza Black Box Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts. 617-933-8600, www.zeitgeiststage.com

CANDIDE Adapted and directed by Mary Zimmerman, this is a robust production of Leonard Bernstein’s 1956 musical, with stellar performances by Lauren Molina as Cunegonde and Geoff Packard as Candide. Through Oct. 16. Huntington Theatre Company, Boston University Theatre, Boston. 617-266-0800, www.huntingtontheatre.org

NEXT FALL A humane and emotionally resonant play by Arlington native Geoffrey Nauffts, superbly acted by a cast of six and insightfully directed by Scott Edmiston, about a gay couple struggling to sustain a relationship amid stark religious differences (one is a fundamentalist Christian, one is a nonbeliever). Through Oct. 15. SpeakEasy Stage Company, Roberts Studio Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts. 617-933-8600, www.speakeasystage.com

HIS GIRL FRIDAY A crackerjack production, with an adaptation by John Guare and direction by Curt Columbus, that plays like a love story about the irresistible allure of the news business. Fred Sullivan Jr. plays editor Walter Burns with inventive rascality, while Angela Brazil brings fire and wit to the role of ace reporter Hildy Johnson. Through Sunday. Trinity Repertory Company, Providence. 401-351-4242, www.trinityrep.com

THREE SISTERS An incisive and well-acted production of Chekhov’s classic, in a new version by Sarah Ruhl, about a trio of sisters who are stuck in a provincial town, searching for happiness, and convinced that it lies in Moscow. Or as they would say: Moscow! Through Saturday. Yale Repertory Theatre, University Theatre, New Haven. 203-432-1234, www.yalerep.org

DON AUCOIN

THE KING AND I With a first-rate company (including Lorenzo Lamas) and a direct, unadorned production, this version of “The King and I’’ finds both the musical heart and the compelling moral compass in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical. Through Sunday. North Shore Music Theatre, Beverly. 978-232-7200, www.nsmt.org

TERRY BYRNE

DANCE

RHYTHM IN THE NIGHT Sean C. Fielder (“Bring in ’Da Noise, Bring in ’Da Funk’’) has emerged locally as a kind of Pied Piper of tap, and this evening-length show of contemporary tap, music, and spoken word by Fielder’s dynamic young Boston Tap Company is sure to be engaging. These spirited tappers, ranging in age from 7 to early 30s, meld energy and enthusiasm with dedication and imagination. Oct. 8, 7:30 p.m. $25-$30. Mainstage Theater, Roxbury Community College, 1234 Columbus Ave. 857-312-2644, www.thebostontapcompany.com

THE WRATHSKELLAR The Boston Babydolls aim for a new level of immersive theater with this Halloween show, unfolding in a pop-up tavern created in a rental storefront. The show tries to evoke an eerie underground where Sweeney Todd might meet Jack the Ripper and features dance, aerial acts, the Babydolls’ trademark burlesque (i.e., striptease), magic, and a rotating slate of guest performers. Enter through the alley - if you dare. Oct. 7-31. $20-$25. 545 Cambridge St., Cambridge. 800-838-3006, www.bostonbabydolls.net

OPENING OUR DOORS 2011 As part of the 10th anniversary of Fenway Alliance’s Opening Our Doors program, members of Boston Ballet will perform excerpts from William Forsythe’s “The Second Detail.’’ Former Frankfurt Ballet principal dancer and new director of Harvard University’s dance program Jill Johnson hosts the interactive presentation, which includes demonstrations and discussion of the choreographer’s creative process. Oct. 10, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Free. Remis Auditorium, Museum of Fine Arts. 617-437-7544, www.fenwayculture.org

WEST AFRICAN DANCE AND DRUMS This weekend, Kittery’s the Dance Hall will resound with the music and dance of Guinea. Featured performers include master artists Sidiki Sylla, Seny Daffe, and Ismael Bangoura of Jeh Kulu Dance and Drum Theater, as well as guests from Ballet Kakandé. Oct. 8, 7:30 p.m. $10-$12, ages 3-12 $5. The Dance Hall, 7 Walker St., Kittery, Maine. 207-703-2083, www.thedancehallkittery.org

KAREN CAMPBELL

GALLERIES

ON SOLID GROUND: ICONOCLAST SCULPTOR DUDLEY VAILL TALCOTT Talcott (1899-1986) blended Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Cubism. Versions of sculptures of a waitress and a cyclist featured in a 1930 show at the Museum of Modern Art are on view. Through Nov. 9. Childs Gallery, 169 Newbury St. 617-266-1108, www.childsgallery.com

PAUL CAPONIGRO: ALCHEMY OF SIGHT From vast vistas to intimate still lifes, the acclaimed landscape photographer creates silver gelatin prints that capture nuances of velvety tone. He takes a particular interest in sacred sites: Irish dolmens, Japanese temples, and the moon over Stonehenge. Through Oct. 24. Pucker Gallery, 171 Newbury St. 617-267-9473, www.puckergallery.com

WE THE DESIGNERS: REFRAMING POLITICAL ISSUES IN THE OBAMA ERA This show asks: In a divisive era, can the power of design help unite citizens? Designers from across the US use their tools to analyze current events. Through Dec. 15. 80 International Village, Northeastern University, 1175 Tremont St. www.art.neu.edu/events/?eid=127

CATE McQUAID

MUSEUMS

DANCE/DRAW Work by 40 artists exploring the multilayered connection between drawing and dance in contemporary art. Through Jan. 16. Institute of Contemporary Art. 617-478-3100, www.icaboston.com

DEGAS AND THE NUDE Edgar Degas’s career-long fascination with the nude is addressed for the first time in this ambitious exhibition organized by Degas expert and departing MFA curator George Shackelford. Sunday through Feb. 5. Museum of Fine Arts. 617-267-9300, www.mfa.org

TEMPORARY STRUCTURES: PERFORMING ARCHITECTURE IN CONTEMPORARY ART Work by artists interested in the intersection between architectural space and performance, including Vito Acconci, Kate Gilmore, Gordon Matta-Clark, and Erwin Wurm. Through Dec. 31. DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln. 781-259-8355, www.decordova.org

PRINTS AND THE PURSUIT OF KNOWLEDGE IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE A rich and scholarly exhibition delving into the connections between artists and science through the dissemination of prints, maps, books, and scientific instruments in the 16th century. Through Dec. 10. Harvard Art Museums. 617-495-9400, www.harvardartmuseums.org

SEBASTIAN SMEE