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THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
FRAME BY FRAME

Glimmers of real life put to striking use

By Sebastian Smee
Globe Staff / December 6, 2011
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The American painter Robert Henri painted this moody, penumbral image in his New York studio in 1902, the day after a train he was on had stopped beside a coal processing plant at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. It is called “Coal Breaker,’’ and it’s on display at Bowdoin College Museum of Art. There was a major coal strike in Pennsylvania in 1902. It had begun two months before Henri stopped at Wilkes-Barre, and continued on for another three months.

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COAL BREAKER By Robert Henri

At: Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine. 207-725-3275, www .bowdoin.edu/art-museum