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Galleries

Still lifes served with lush gruesomeness

Large-scale photos explore beauty, violence

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent / January 4, 2012
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Still life painting has often had an allegorical agenda. The resplendent, sometimes picked-over spreads in 17^th -century Dutch still lifes could be read as a moral injunction against gluttony. Other still lifes of the era, featuring skulls and rotten food, cautioned viewers about life’s quick passage. Rendered with lush hyper-realism, these works pull you in with their loveliness before they pierce you with their message.

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TARA SELLIOS: Lessons of Impermanence

At: Suffolk University Art Gallery, 75 Arlington St., through Jan. 11. 617-573-8785, www.jameshull.com/ suffolkartgallery.html

MARY ARMSTRONG: Any Given Moment

At: Victoria Munroe Fine Art, 161 Newbury St., through Jan. 21. 617-523-0661, www.victoria munroefineart.com

HENRY WOLYNIEC: New Work

At: Ellen Miller Gallery, 38 Newbury St., through Jan. 11. 617-536-4650, www.ellenmillergallery.com