Arts & Entertainment

Lena Dunham’s ‘Girls’ flirts with maturity

Clockwise from top: Lena Dunham, Adam Driver, Allison Williams and Jemima Kirke in the 20-something drama “Girls.”
Clockwise from top: Lena Dunham, Adam Driver, Allison Williams and Jemima Kirke in the 20-something drama “Girls.”Credit: photos by Jessica Miglio

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The gloom that settled over the second season of “Girls” started as a slight shadow. It crept across the weeks until it enveloped every aspect of the Lena Dunham’s exceedingly well-written, thrift shop-decorated New York universe. While we were distracted by the sex, cocaine experimentation, and Patrick Wilson, the lives of the messy and affluent protagonists started chipping and snapping. And that’s even before the Q-tip incident.

The love lives of the quartet were crumbling. That’s to be expected. When you care more about what goes into your smoothie than maintaining a relationship, people tend to up and leave. What was not expected, and perhaps most disturbing, was the unraveling of the friendships that had provided a slight anchor to the mercurial storylines.

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