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October 26, 2012

In preparation for Eid al-Adha

Eid al-Adha also called Feast of the Sacrifice, is an important 3-day religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide to honor the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his young first-born son Ismail (Ishmael) a as an act of submission to God and his son's acceptance of the sacrifice, before God intervened to provide Abraham with a ram to sacrifice instead. The 3 days and 2 nights of Eid al-Adha are celebrated annually on the 10th, 11th and 12th day of Dhu al-Hijjah, the twelfth and last month of the lunar Islamic calendar. Eid begins today. -- Paula Nelson ( 32 photos total)

A livestock market ahead of the sacrificial Eid al-Adha festival in Karachi, Oct. 24, 2012. Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of Sacrifice, honors Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ishmael on the order of God, who according to tradition then provided a lamb in the boy's place. (Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistanis walk in a livestock market set up in a field, for the upcoming Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, or "Feast of Sacrifice", during sunset, on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press)#

A sheep waits to be sold at a market ahead of Eid al-Adha festival in Srinagar, India, Oct. 23,2012. Muslims celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, camels or cows. The slaughter commemorates the biblical story of Prophet Abraham, who was on the verge of sacrificing his son to obey God's command when God interceded by substituting a ram in the child's place. (Mukhtar Khan/Associated Press)#

Camels are displayed for sale at a market, for the upcoming Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in Karachi, Pakistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Shakil Adil/Associated Press)#

A boy dances with a sheep at a livestock market ahead of Eid al-Adha festival in Sanaa, Oct. 24, 2012. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (Mohamed al-Sayaghi/Reuters)#

A sheep is weighed at a market ahead of Eid al-Adha festival in Srinagar, India, Oct. 23, 2012. (Mukhtar Khan/Associated Press)#

A boy holds a sheep as he waits for customers at a livestock market in Kabul, October 23, 2012. Muslims around the world are preparing to celebrate Eid al-Adha. (Mohammad Ismail/Reuters)#

An Egyptian child stands between a cluster of sheep on a sidewalk, offered for sale in preparation for Eid al-Adha, one of the most important holidays in the Islamic calendar, in Cairo, Egypt, Oct. 21, 2012. (Nasser Nasser/Associated Press)#

Children sit among livestock at a market in Lagos, Nigeria, Oct. 23, 2012. Muslims worldwide will celebrate Eid al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice, commemorating God's provision of a ram to substitute for Abraham's impending sacrifice of his son, where able Muslims offer either a goat, sheep, cow, buffalo, or camel during the feast rituals. (Sunday Alamba/Associated Press)#

An Afghan boy holds a rope tied to a cow to bring it to sell at a livestock market for the upcoming Eid al-Adha festival in Kabul, Afghanistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Musadeq Sadeq/Associated Press)#

An Afghan animal seller sprays color on the head of his sheep to have him recognized at a livestock market for the upcoming Eid al-Adha festival in Kabul, Afghanistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Musadeq Sadeq/Associated Press)#

An Egyptian butcher holds a sheep on a sidewalk, part of a cluster of sheep that is offered for sale in preparation for Eid al-Adha, one of the most important holidays in the Islamic calendar in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptians are feeling the squeeze from 19 months of political turmoil that have gutted the nation's economy and brought home the meaning of the four-day Festival of Sacrifice, which begins Friday. (Nasser Nasser/Associated Press)#

Camels are fed at a livestock market ahead of the upcoming Muslim Eid al-Adha festival near the West Bank town of Jenin, Oct. 24, 2012. Muslims will celebrate Eid al Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, on Oct. 27, by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows or camels. (Mohammed Ballas/Associated Press)#

Palestinians gather at a sheep market in Behtlehem, Oct. 24, 2012, ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha or "Feast of the Sacrifice." (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)#

An Egyptian child looks at animal parts displayed for sale at an open air butcher's shop, in preparation for Eid al-Adha, one of the most important holidays in the Islamic calendar, at a sidewalk in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptians are feeling the squeeze from 19 months of political turmoil that have gutted the nation's economy and brought home the meaning of the four-day Festival of Sacrifice. (Nasser Nasser/Associated Press)#

An Egyptian butcher displays meat for sale at an open air butcher's shop with Arabic that reads, "buffalo 44," in preparation for Eid al-Adha, one of the most important holidays in the Islamic calendar, at a side walk in Cairo, Egypt. (Nasser Nasser/Associated Press)#

Afghan shoppers throng the Mandave main market in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) is celebrated throughout the Muslim world. The festival falls on the tenth day of Zulhijjah, the final month of the Muslim Calendar. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#

A Pakistani man is reflected in a mirror while trying on a traditional hat, as he and others buy new clothes for the upcoming Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, or "Feast of Sacrifice", in Peshawar, Pakistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Mohammad Sajjad/Associated Press)#

People shop for new clothes ahead of the upcoming Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha in Baghdad, Iraq, Oct. 24, 2012. It is part of tradition to buy and wear new clothes during Eid al-Adha or the Feast of Sacrifice. (Hadi Mizban/Associated Press)#

A man buys nuts ahead of Eid al-Adha festival in Sanaa, Oct. 24, 2012. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha. (Mohamed al-Sayaghi/Reuters)#

A woman prepares cakes for the oven ahead of Eid al-Adha festival in Sanaa, Oct. 24, 2012. (Mohamed al-Sayaghi/Reuters)#

Afghan women shop at a market ahead of the upcoming Eid al-Adha, in Jalalabad east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Rahmat Gul/Associated Press)#

People shop for new clothes ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha in Baghdad, Iraq, Oct. 24, 2012. (Hadi Mizban/Associated Press)#

People shop ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha in Baghdad, Iraq, Oct. 24, 2012. (Hadi Mizban/Associated Press)#

An Afghan man sells traditional sweets ahead of the upcoming Eid al-Adha in Jalalabad east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Oct. 24, 2012. (Rahmat Gul/Associated Press)#

An Afghan candy seller waits for customers in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God. The festival falls on the tenth day of Zulhijjah, the final month of the Muslim Calendar and cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on the holiest day. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#

An Afghan shopkeeper arranges burqas at his store in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha, celebrated throughout the Muslim world. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#

An Afghan woman buys dried fruits at the Mandave main market in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#

An Afghan woman buys goods at the Mandave main market in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#

Vendors sell blankets at the Mandave main market in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#

An Afghan baker cooks traditional cookies at a factory in the city of Jalalabad, Oct. 23, 2012 ahead of the Muslim feast. (Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images)#

Pedestrians walk toward home along a dusty road in downtown Kabul, Oct. 23, 2012, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha. (Jawad Jalali/AFP/Getty Images)#


 
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