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March 19, 2014

Holi celebrations 2014

Earlier this week Hindus greeted the turn of winter into spring with a massive display of color. They call their celebration the festival of Holi, and Hindus across India and throughout the world share prayer, camaraderie, special food, and a general sense of mischief as they douse each other in dyes and colored water. The festival has roots to many Hindu legends associated with the triumph of good over evil. --Lloyd Young (35 photos total)

An Indian boy drags another on the floor of an apartment as they play with colors during the Holi festival in Chennai, India, on March 16. The festival also marks the advent of spring. (Arun Sankar K/Associated Press)

A reveler smeared with colors dances to Bollywood tunes during the Holi festival in Bangalore, India, on March 17. Holi is celebrated at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month Phalguna (February or March) and its main day is celebrated by people throwing colored powder and colored water at each other. (Jagadeesh NV/EPA) #

An Indian boy plays in a pool of colored water, at the end of Holi celebrations, the Hindu festival of colors at the Baldev Temple in Dauji, 180 kilometers (113 miles) south of New Delhi, India, on March 18. The Baldev Temple is known for a ritual where the women playfully hit men with whips made of cloth as men throw buckets of water mixed with orange dye. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

Indian revelers cover each other with colored powder and dance while taking part in Holi festival celebrations in Guwahati on March 17. Holi, the festival of colors, is a popular Hindu spring festival observed in India and Nepal at the end of winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month. (Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images) #

A man reacts to colored water being splashed over him during Holi celebrations in the southern Indian city of Chennai on March 17. (Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images) #

An Indian man with his face smeared with colors to celebrate Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Allahabad, India, on March 17. The holiday, celebrated mainly in India and Nepal, marks the beginning of spring and the triumph of good over evil. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

An Indian child adorned with colored powder poses for a photograph while taking part in celebrations for the spring festival Holi in Bhubaneswar on March 16. Holi, the popular Hindu spring festival of colors is observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month. (Asit Kumar/AFP/Getty Images) #

A reveler covered in colored powder poses for a photo as she takes part in Holi celebrations organized by members of South Korea's Indian community at Haeundae beach in the southeastern city of Busan on March 16. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images) #

Indian Hindu widows and Harijan, or former untouchable, women play with colored water for the first time as part of Holi celebrations organized by a non-governmental organization Sulabh at the Meera Sahbhagini Ashram in Vrindavan, India, on March 14. The widows, many of whom at times have lived desperate lives in the streets of the temple town, celebrated the festival at the century old ashram. After their husband's deaths the women have been banished by their families, for supposedly bringing bad luck, to the town where devotees believe Lord Krishna was born. (Manish Swarup/Associated Press) #

Indian children play in a pool of colored water at the end of Holi celebrations, the Hindu festival of colors at the Baldev Temple in Dauji, 180 kilometers (113 miles) south of New Delhi, India, on March 18. The Baldev Temple is known for a ritual where the women playfully hit men with whips made of cloth as men throw buckets of water mixed with orange dye. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

Children take part in Holi celebrations in the southern Indian city of Chennai on March 16. (Babu/Reuters) #

Students extend their hands to receive colored powder from their teacher during Holi celebrations at a school in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad on March 15. (Amit Dave/Reuters) #

A boy sits under a water tap to wash himself after taking part in Holi celebrations in the southern Indian city of Chennai on March 16. (Babu/Reuters) #

A girl smeared with colors reacts as another girl throws colored powder at her during Holi celebrations in the southern Indian city of Chennai on March 16. (Babu/Reuters) #

Boys throw colored powder at another boy standing on a pole as they take part in Holi celebrations in the southern Indian city of Chennai on March 17. (Babu/Reuters) #

An Indian schoolchild dressed as the Hindu god Krishna and adorned with colored powder stands among other students during celebrations for the spring festival Holi in Bhubaneswar on March 16. (Asit Kumar/AFP/Getty Images) #

A Hindu priest throws colored powder over devotees as they celebrate the Holi festival at the Radha Krishna temple in Kolkata on March 17. Holi, the popular Hindu spring festival of colors is observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month. (AFP/Getty Images) #

Bangladeshi students celebrate the festival of color after smearing each other with colored powder during Holi Festival in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on March 16. (Abir Abdullah/EPA) #

A widow throws flowers into the air during Holi celebrations organized by non-governmental organization Sulabh International at a widows' ashram in Vrindavan in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh on March 14. (Ahmad Masood/Reuters) #

A man smears the face of a woman with colors during celebrations marking Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Mumbai, India, on March 17. The holiday, celebrated mainly in India and Nepal, marks the beginning of spring and the triumph of good over evil. (Rajanish Kakade/Associated Press) #

A widow throws flowers into the air during the Holi celebrations organized by non-governmental organization Sulabh International at a widows' ashram in Vrindavan in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh on March 14. Traditionally in Hindu culture, widows are expected to renounce earthly pleasure so they do not celebrate Holi. But women at the shelter for widows, who have been abandoned by their families, celebrated the festival by throwing flowers and colored powder. (Ahmad Masood/Reuters) #

A man dances as he takes part in a colorful procession locally known as "Badshah ki Sawari" as part of Holi celebrations in Beawar, in the desert Indian state of Rajasthan on March 18. (Himanshu Sharma/Reuters) #

A man smeared in colored powder rests beside a dog in front of closed shops after celebrations marking Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Allahabad, India, on March 17. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

Hindu devotees raise their hands to receive colored holy water from a priest (unseen) outside a temple during Holi celebrations in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad on March 17. (Amit Dave/Reuters) #

Indians, faces smeared with colored powder, dance during celebrations marking Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Gauhati, India, on March 17. (Anupam Nath/Associated Press) #

Hindu priest Babulal jumps out of a fire to signify the burning of the demon Holika during a ritual to mark the first day of the Holi spring festival, also known as the festival of colors, at village Phalen near the northern Indian city of Mathura on March 17. Holi in Phalen starts on the first day of the full moon where a Hindu mythological story will be re-enacted to symbolize the victory of good over evil, according to local media. (Adnan Abidi/Reuters) #

An Indian man dances near a bonfire as they celebrate Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Allahabad, India, on March 16. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

Indian widows covered in colored powder take part in Holi celebrations at an ashram in Vrindavan on March 17. Breaking centuries-old tradition, widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring color festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colors and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images) #

Indian Hindu widows play with colored powder as a part of Holi celebrations at the Pagal Baba Ashram in Vrindavan, India, on March 15. The widows, many of whom at times have lived desperate lives in the streets of the temple town, celebrated the festival at the ashram. After their husband's deaths the women have been banished by their families to the town where devotees believe Lord Krishna was born, for supposedly bringing bad luck. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

Indian men shield themselves from women beating them with wooden sticks during the annual Lathmar Holi festival in Barsana village, Mathura, India, on March 9. In Barsana, people celebrate a variation of Holi called 'Lathmar' Holi, which means beating with sticks. During the Lathmar Holi festival, the women of Barsana, the birth place of Hindu God Krishna's beloved Radha, beat the men from Nandgaon, the hometown of Hindu God Krishna, with wooden sticks in response to their efforts to put color on them. (Harish Tyagi/EPA) #

An Indian girl, face smeared with color, reacts to the camera as she squirts water on others during celebrations marking Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Gauhati, India, on March 17. The holiday, celebrated mainly in India and Nepal, marks the beginning of spring and the triumph of good over evil. (Anupam Nath/Associated Press) #

A man lies on the ground smeared with colored powder during celebrations marking Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Allahabad, India, on March 17. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/Associated Press) #

Indian revelers play with colored powder during Holi celebrations in Hyderabad on March 17. Holi, also called the festival of colors, is a popular Hindu spring festival observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month. (Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images) #

A Hindu man from the village of Nangaon teases men from Barsana as they play Holi at the Ladali or Radha temple before the procession for the Lathmar Holi festival, the legendary hometown of Radha, consort of Hindu God Krishna, in Barsana 115 kilometers (71 miles) from New Delhi, India, on March 9. During Lathmar Holi the women of Barsana beat the men from Nandgaon, the hometown of Krishna, with wooden sticks in response to their teasing as they depart the town. (Altaf Qadri/Associated Press) #

An Indian man throws colored powder on another as they celebrate Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, in Mumbai India, on March 17. The festival heralds the arrival of spring. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press) #

 
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