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Five Women Leaders

Posted by Maura Welch December 11, 2013 03:28 PM

TEDxBeaconStreet 2013 included talks by  five amazing women leaders.

Beth Babcock, featured in another post, is the CEO of Crittenton Women’s Union.  Her talk features the latest findings from brain science, which her organization is using to create new approaches for the war on poverty.  View her talk here.

The other four women give advice from four different perspectives that might all be described as ways to make the most out of your life and your career.

First, Dr. Erica Ebbel Angle, founder of  Science from Scientists and CEO of  Counterpoint Health Solutions, encourages listeners to “explore your edges” to discover who you were meant to become and how to leave the most significant legacy.  ”Cool things happen at the edges”, Angle asserts, and tells her own story of being a self-described science geek and pageant queen, on her way to founding two organizations.  View her talk here.

Kathleen Murphy, head of Personal Investing for Fidelity Investments, says “you work hard for your money”, and encourages viewers, men and women alike,  to take a little time to “make sure that your money works hard for you”.  Murphy makes a case for “taking time to prepare for the life you want to live”.  Her talk is called Get Serious, Get Smart, Get Going!

Susan Colantuono, CEO of Leading Women, offers insight into so many women are “mired in the middle” of organizations and what has to happen to take them to the top.  While women now constitute 50% of middle managers, companies have failed to close the gender gap at the highest levels.  Colantuono’s research about the Missing 33% in the career advice given to women, i.e. the typically unspoken requirement that leaders must actively demonstrate business, financial, and strategic acumen to be considered for top jobs, will change how women prepare themselves for the highest-level positions. View her talk, Closing the Leadership Gender Gap.

Finally, Gail Goodman, CEO of Constant Contact, shares advice for entrepreneurs in her humorous (but serious) talk “Founders Can’t Scale”.  In this talk, she discusses what founders need to know if their organizations are to make the difficult transition from a small, entrepreneurial companies to successful large enterprises:  founders must understand that “your flaws are hurting your team”, and that “feedback is a gift” that will help you change and adapt as your organization scales.

 

Beth Babcock – Science Reshaping Poverty Copy

Posted by Maura Welch December 9, 2013 01:26 AM

Crittenton Women’s Union CEO Beth Babcock told us a story of hope at this year’s TEDxBeaconStreet.

The story is rooted in difficult facts. More than 46 million Americans live in poverty today. One in seven households were food insecure last year. These statistics persist in spite of a system working hard to counteract it. The war on poverty continues, but persistently high numbers of impoverished families continue to seem stuck.  Aid is offered in exchange for immediate returns on investment in a penny-wise and pound-foolish way that Beth explains after her talk. Thus the cycle continues.

In addition, the pathways out of poverty are more difficult than ever to navigate.  Increasingly, middle-class jobs that will support a family require some level of education after high school.  However, the negative effects of poverty — malnutrition, increased stress, fewer educational opportunities — are also correlated with changes in the brain – in fact, with the very “executive functions” that would help you successfully juggle the competing demands of holding down a job, taking care of a family, and working your way toward the degree that will secure your future.

Beth Babcock tells a story of breaking the cycle of poverty with new insight and approaches offered by brain science.  It turns out that the brain’s executive function can be developed, and adding this component to more traditional approaches is delivering astounding early outcomes, including high rates of educational success and home purchase.

The core fact, inspirational to all, is that the difficulty of poverty is solvable. Science will help us get there. Beth’s work continues to apply hard science to develop approaches that will help millions break the poverty cycle.

Beth Babcock – Science Reshaping Poverty

Posted by Maura Welch December 9, 2013 01:26 AM

Crittenton Women’s Union CEO Beth Babcock told us a story of hope at this year’s TEDxBeaconStreet.

The story is rooted in difficult facts. More than 46 million Americans live in poverty today. One in seven households were food insecure last year. These statistics persist in spite of a system working hard to counteract it. The war on poverty continues, but persistently high numbers of impoverished families continue to seem stuck.  Aid is offered in exchange for immediate returns on investment in a penny-wise and pound-foolish way that Beth explains after her talk. Thus the cycle continues.

In addition, the pathways out of poverty are more difficult than ever to navigate.  Increasingly, middle-class jobs that will support a family require some level of education after high school.  However, the negative effects of poverty — malnutrition, increased stress, fewer educational opportunities — are also correlated with changes in the brain – in fact, with the very “executive functions” that would help you successfully juggle the competing demands of holding down a job, taking care of a family, and working your way toward the degree that will secure your future.

Beth Babcock tells a story of breaking the cycle of poverty with new insight and approaches offered by brain science.  It turns out that the brain’s executive function can be developed, and adding this component to more traditional approaches is delivering astounding early outcomes, including high rates of educational success and home purchase.

The core fact, inspirational to all, is that the difficulty of poverty is solvable. Science will help us get there. Beth’s work continues to apply hard science to develop approaches that will help millions break the poverty cycle.

Yogibos: For Adventurous Sitters

Posted by Maura Welch December 6, 2013 01:12 AM

Did you enjoy watching TEDxBeaconStreet from the comfort of a Yogibo?

Yogibo-1You still can!  Imagine reliving the TEDxBeaconStreet experience watching our livestream videos on a Yogibo of your very own.  It is a great gift for the holidays.  Check them out online at www.yogibo.com!  As a thank you for your participation, members of our TEDxBeaconStreet community can enjoy a 10% discount off online purchases with the code “TEDx10″.

TEDxBeaconStreet is about Adventures, and sitting in one of these is definitely an adventure.  Our partners at Yogibos transformed the Lincoln School gym into a massive screening room (thoroughly enjoyed by TEDx-ers of all ages).  These Yogibo bean bags are super lightweight allowing you to easily move them from room-to-room and will become the most sought after, fought over, and adored piece of furniture in your home!

Eyal Levy, founded Yogibo in 2009, to bringing their new-fangled, super-comfy and supportive lounge bags on the road to outdoor events and craft shows. “Ooooo”, people said. “Ahhhh”, they repeated. And Yogibo caught on, like wildfire.  Yogibo has 14 store locations from Maine to New Jersey!  The very first store was in the Natick Mall, in Natick, MA.

The Hero’s Journey Led Me Astray | Colin Stokes Copy

Posted by Maura Welch December 3, 2013 05:07 PM

The runaway hit of TEDxBeaconStreet 2012 was Colin Stokes’ talk, “The Hidden Meanings in Kids’ Movies.”  The Brookline father’s reflections on “The Wizard of Oz” and “Star Wars” has been viewed more than 2 million times, catching the eye of Kevin Spacey, Sheryl Sandberg, and Upworthy.  He was even invited to Walt Disney Animation Studios to expand on his point of view for the makers of “Frozen.” (“Which features,” he points out gleefully, “a team led by women to bring out the best in others!”)

For his return appearance on the Lincoln School stage, Colin says he wanted to continue asking challenging questions.  ”I think one reason my talk worked last year was that it started easy and got hard,” he says.  ”If you can help an audience relax and laugh, you can sneak tougher ideas through their defenses.”

His follow-up does indeed start out easy (The Hero’s Journey) and get hard (race and the movies).  ”American culture is less able to hide from race in 2013 than it has been for a while,” says Colin, who works at an education non-profit that works with children in low-income neighborhoods, most of whom are African-American or Latino.  ”On the one hand, current events are making injustice in our society painfully clear.  On the other hand, you have Hollywood releasing an unusual set of movies about the African-American experience.  I grew a lot this year, and I wanted to share what that meant to me.”

Colin sees these talks less like lectures than as personal essays.  ”I am not an authority on race in America, obviously,” he says, “and I wasn’t any kind of expert on feminism.  I do a lot of reading and listening, but I try to speak only from my experience.  I hope people will reflect on their own experience too, and maybe change just a little.”

You can read Colin’s ongoing thoughts on movies and culture at his blog, Zoom Out.

The Hero’s Journey Led Me Astray | Colin Stokes

Posted by Maura Welch December 3, 2013 05:07 PM

The runaway hit of TEDxBeaconStreet 2012 was Colin Stokes’ talk, “The Hidden Meanings in Kids’ Movies.”  The Brookline father’s reflections on “The Wizard of Oz” and “Star Wars” has been viewed more than 1.5 million times, catching the eye of Kevin Spacey, Sheryl Sandberg, and Upworthy.  He was even invited to Walt Disney Animation Studio to expand on his point of view for the makers of “Frozen.” (“Which features,” he points out gleefully, “a team led by women to bring out the best in others!”)

For his return appearance on the Lincoln School stage, Colin says he wanted to continue asking challenging questions.  ”I think one reason my talk worked last year was that it started easy and got hard,” he says.  ”If you can help an audience relax and laugh, you can sneak tougher ideas through their defenses.”

His follow-up does indeed start out easy (The Hero’s Journey) and get hard (race and the movies).  ”American culture is less able to hide from race in 2013 than it has been for a while,” says Colin, who works at an education non-profit that works with children in low-income neighborhoods, most of whom are African-American or Latino.  ”On the one hand, current events are making injustice in our society painfully clear.  On the other hand, you have Hollywood releasing an unusual set of movies about the African-American experience.  I grew a lot this year, and I wanted to share what that meant to me.”

Colin sees these talks less like lectures than as personal essays.  ”I am not an authority on race in America, obviously,” he says, “and I wasn’t any kind of expert on feminism.  I do a lot of reading and listening, but I try to speak only from my experience.  I hope people will reflect on their own experience too, and maybe change just a little.”

About this blog

TEDxBeaconStreet is a Greater Boston TEDx founded on the mission IDEAS IN ACTION, with speakers carefully curated for a free conference series: TEDxBeaconStreet and TEDxBeaconStreetYouth. Save the date for our next conference Nov. 16 and 17. More »

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