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Beyond 3-D Printing Copy

Posted by Maura Welch January 17, 2014 03:09 PM

By Sally Wu

Ben Peters is a lifelong tinkerer, builder, and engineer. In his work as a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab, Ben explores the potentials of 3D printing, among other projects.

On the TEDxBeaconStreet stage, he shared his innovative work on a digitally-controlled mold which uses an array of moving pins. This new tool allows for the design and printing of any shape along a surface, reducing the conventional limits of manufacturing, and increasing the potential for new products.

In an interview at TEDxBeaconStreet, Ben shared more of his thoughts about his work, background, and ideas about how to bring out new innovations.   He talked about he advances that are being made possible by 3-D printing:

“You have total design freedom. You can create organic looking shapes using algorithms to make geometries that are very hard to manufacture… Many times, people think of making conventional things like nails and bolts, things that are readily available for engineers. Now, people can think about making the whole thing as one piece. 

I think the really exciting thing isn’t what exists already. What 3D printers will enable us to do is advance in all these other fields. It’s like giving tools to people who don’t normally have tools.”

 Having a 3D printer that can create any geometry generates ideas for other fields such as synthetic biology. With the technology improving rapidly to become more accurate, faster, and with higher resolution, Ben is excited about the potential for 3D printing to expand into the complex function and structure of cells.

With new tools redefining what is possible and equipping users with more power to explore the unconventional, Ben believes that entirely new approaches to problems will be created.  It’s not about making one tool that can do everything, but creating a collection of tools and an environment that allows you to make everything.”

Beyond 3-D Printing

Posted by Maura Welch January 17, 2014 03:09 PM

By Sally Wu

Ben Peters is a lifelong tinkerer, builder, and engineer. In his work as a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab, Ben explores the potentials of 3D printing, among other projects.

On the TEDxBeaconStreet stage, he shared his innovative work on a digitally-controlled mold which uses an array of moving pins. This new tool allows for the design and printing of any shape along a surface, reducing the conventional limits of manufacturing, and increasing the potential for new products.

In an interview at TEDxBeaconStreet, Ben shared more of his thoughts about his work, background, and ideas about how to bring out new innovations.   He talked about he advances that are being made possible by 3-D printing:

“You have total design freedom. You can create organic looking shapes using algorithms to make geometries that are very hard to manufacture… Many times, people think of making conventional things like nails and bolts, things that are readily available for engineers. Now, people can think about making the whole thing as one piece. 

I think the really exciting thing isn’t what exists already. What 3D printers will enable us to do is advance in all these other fields. It’s like giving tools to people who don’t normally have tools.”

 Having a 3D printer that can create any geometry generates ideas for other fields such as synthetic biology. With the technology improving rapidly to become more accurate, faster, and with higher resolution, Ben is excited about the potential for 3D printing to expand into the complex function and structure of cells.

With new tools redefining what is possible and equipping users with more power to explore the unconventional, Ben believes that entirely new approaches to problems will be created.  It’s not about making one tool that can do everything, but creating a collection of tools and an environment that allows you to make everything.”

Gifts for Any Season

Posted by Maura Welch January 7, 2014 03:57 PM

Have you ever struggled to come up with unique and meaningful gifts for birthdays or holidays?

Two of our TEDxBeaconStreet 2013 speakers have set the bar about as high as it can be set with their once-in-a-lifetime gifts to their loved ones.

Cerise Jacobs, a lawyer and entrepreneur, woke up one day inspired to write a new American opera as a 75th- birthday gift to her husband Charles.  She based the opera on the most beloved myth in China — the thousand-year-old legend of the White Snake.  Charles lived to see the world premier of Madame White Snake, which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize.  Watch The Snake Charmer’s Birthday Gift here.

Cerise

Allyssa Bates donated a kidney to her younger brother Chris.  In her talk, Confessions of a Kidney Donor, she talks about the donation process from the donor’s perspective, saying, “I had so many questions about what my life would look like post-donation, and it was very difficult to find answers.  By sharing my story, I hope more people consider becoming a donor as they realize it doesn’t have to slow them down.”  It’s clear that Allyssa didn’t slow down – 10 months after giving her brother a kidney, she ran the Boston Marathon!

Alyssa Bates

As we reflect on 2013, we are clear that our biggest gift is you, the TEDxBeaconStreet community!  Thank you for another wonderful year.

 

About this blog

TEDxBeaconStreet is a Greater Boston TEDx founded on the mission IDEAS IN ACTION, with speakers carefully curated for a free conference series: TEDxBeaconStreet and TEDxBeaconStreetYouth. Save the date for our next conference Nov. 16 and 17. More »

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