November 15, 2010

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INNOVATION ECONOMY

Page one

Immigration enforcement turns to firms

Federal immigration officials are increasingly imposing thousands of dollars in fines on New England companies — from Fenway Park snack vendors to a Maine blueberry grower — for failing to prove that all their employees are in the United States legally. (By Maria Sacchetti, Globe Staff)

O’Malley tells Dublin he is there to listen

Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley told Catholics in Dublin yesterday morning that he could not offer a “quick fix’’ to the dire situation facing the Irish church as it struggles to address a massive crisis over clergy sexual abuse of minors. (By Lisa Wangsness, Globe Staff)

Despite law, many still unsure
when to sound hazing alarm

25 years after the state’s antihazing bill was signed into law, many students and parents are still confused about what constitutes hazing. (By Stephanie Ebbert and Shelley Murphy, Globe Staff)

School chief’s plan reversals draw fire

Boston schools Superintendent Carol R. Johnson's recent start-and-stop proposals, such as her plan to close some schools that she halted after accusations the move was based on faulty data, are frustrating even her supporters. (By James Vaznis, Globe Staff)

Once you hit send, privacy is gone

The risk of private e-mails being seen by unintended recipients is hardly new. Yet the ease and speed with which these communications can now spread have turned the e-landscape into even more of a minefield than it was a few years ago. (By Joseph P. Kahn, Globe Staff)

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