The City Seen from The Boston Globe
HAYMARKET -- Lucy, left, and Fannie Giarle are sisters in their nineties who were born and raised in the North End. Every other week, they make the 15-minute trip on foot to the Haymarket, which has provided inexpensive produce to city-dwellers from its open-air stalls since 1734. On this day, the Giarle sisters returned home with carrots, onions, pineapple, cabbage, escarole, lettuce, squash, and cucumbers. They buy whatever is in season and have been coming to the market on Blackstone Street since 1966, when their mother died and they took over the chore. ''I enjoy it, I really do,' said Fannie. 'I see all the new food and vegetables and I see all the people. When you get to my age, there’s no more dancing.' (Globe Staff Photo / Suzanne Kreiter) audio: Click the play button below to hear photographer Suzanne Kreiter describe the scene at the Haymarket <object classid='clsid:02BF25D5-8C17-4B23-BC80-D3488ABDDC6B' width='200' height='30' codebase= 'http://www.apple.com/qtactivex/qtplugin.cab'> (Audio by Scott LaPierre, Boston.com)
Shopping day
HAYMARKET -- Lucy, left, and Fannie Giarle are sisters in their nineties who were born and raised in the North End. Every other week, they make the 15-minute trip on foot to the Haymarket, which has provided inexpensive produce to city-dwellers from its open-air stalls since 1734. On this day, the Giarle sisters returned home with carrots, onions, pineapple, cabbage, escarole, lettuce, squash, and cucumbers. They buy whatever is in season and have been coming to the market on Blackstone Street since 1966, when their mother died and they took over the chore. ''I enjoy it, I really do," said Fannie. "I see all the new food and vegetables and I see all the people. When you get to my age, there’s no more dancing."

(Globe Staff Photo / Suzanne Kreiter)

audio: Click the play button below to hear photographer Suzanne Kreiter describe the scene at the Haymarket
(Audio by Scott LaPierre, Boston.com)