The City Seen from The Boston Globe
SOUTH END -- The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts New England Medical Center helps mothers and children in the crucial weeks before and a premature birth. One recent afternoon, Leslie Mojica of Lawrence held her son, Elijah Domenech, who was born at only 24 weeks and weighed only one pound, nine ounces at the time. Six weeks after his early arrival, Elijah was thriving. His weight was up to two pounds, 15 ounces. His mother and he participate in 'kangaroo care,' a method of holding premature babies on the mother's warm skin to help with growth and development. 'It's kid tested, and mother approved,' says Mojica. Nursing care, such as tube feedings, is provided at the same time. (Globe Staff Photo / Suzanne Kreiter) audio: Click the play button below to hear RN Kathy DeBartolomis describe the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit <object classid='clsid:02BF25D5-8C17-4B23-BC80-D3488ABDDC6B' width='200' height='30' codebase= 'http://www.apple.com/qtactivex/qtplugin.cab'> (Audio by Scott LaPierre, Boston.com)
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SOUTH END -- The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts New England Medical Center helps mothers and children in the crucial weeks before and a premature birth. One recent afternoon, Leslie Mojica of Lawrence held her son, Elijah Domenech, who was born at only 24 weeks and weighed only one pound, nine ounces at the time. Six weeks after his early arrival, Elijah was thriving. His weight was up to two pounds, 15 ounces. His mother and he participate in "kangaroo care," a method of holding premature babies on the mother's warm skin to help with growth and development. "It's kid tested, and mother approved," says Mojica. Nursing care, such as tube feedings, is provided at the same time.

(Globe Staff Photo / Suzanne Kreiter)

audio: Click the play button below to hear RN Kathy DeBartolomis describe the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
(Audio by Scott LaPierre, Boston.com)