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Medical marijuana passes, but many questions still unanswered

Posted by Rob Anderson  November 6, 2012 09:41 PM

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Massachusetts voters have voted decisively to make medical marijuana legally available. Some voters undoubtedly embraced the initiative as a welcome step toward outright legalization of the drug. Others voted yes on Question 3 in sympathy with seriously ill people who find relief from pain and anxiety by smoking the drug.

But who is going to sympathize with Massachusetts if the ballot initiative turns out to be a fig leaf for rampant abuse as is the case in California and Colorado? Certainly not billionaire Peter Lewis, the former CEO of Progressive Corp. who provided nearly all of the money to push the ballot initiative across the finish line. Lewis thinks the nation's drug laws are ludicrous. But others look at the massive diversion of medical marijuana from shady dispensaries into the hands of teenagers and conclude that Lewis's cause is ludicrous.

It's pretty tough to use the words "marijuana" and "medical" in the same sentence when there is no information on proper dosage, usage, or even which conditions call for the use of pot. But that’s the door that Massachusetts voters have opened.


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ABOUT THE ANGLE Online commentary and news analysis from the Boston Globe. The Angle is produced by Rob Anderson and Alan Wirzbicki. You can follow Rob on Twitter at @rcand.

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