THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
WORCESTER: WHAT’S NOT TO LIKE?

An easy target, city has many charms

March 29, 2011

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I AM proud to call Worcester my hometown, and was surprised to see Brian McGrory take it to task (“Wowed in Worcester,’’ Metro, March 23). There is no doubt Worcester presents a large and easy target. However, I wish McGrory would save the arrows in his journalistic quiver to fire at the tires of all those Land Rovers and Escalades parked in the sweeping pebbled driveways of Hingham and Cohasset.

First, Worcester is a true working-class city, and the home of one of the most conscientious public servants in the US House, Jim McGovern. McGovern is one of the last unapologetic “capital D’’ Democrats and liberals in a Commonwealth that used to boast of his ilk.

Second, there is no city in the country with a greater concentration of colleges and hospitals. My late father was a neurosurgeon at all of them, and taught at UMass Medical School.

Our art museum is among the best in the country, and the American Antiquarian Society always reminded me of that library in “Citizen Kane.’’

Local color includes many great diners, including the Miss Worcester (the “Miss Woo’’) and Ralph’s Chadwick Square. Weintraub’s deli and Widoff’s bakery on Water Street are nothing less than Hester Street North.

Our seven hills are dotted with tenements, churches, bodegas, and triple-deckers populated with yet another generation of strivers. McGrory can come back sometime, and I’ll take him on a real tour of my hometown.

Richard A. Johnson, Braintree