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KITCHEN AIDE

Grape Bloom

(Photograph by Jim Scherer, Styling by Catrine Kelty)
By Adam Ried
September 21, 2008

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The powdery-white coating that’s visible on some grapes (as well as on other dark-colored, soft fruits such as plums) is known as bloom, though it’s technical name is cutin, says Jim Howard, consumer education specialist at the California Table Grape Commission. The bloom, naturally occurring and composed mostly of waxy oleanolic acid, helps protect the grapes against moisture loss and ... (Full article: 101 words)

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