RadioBDC Logo
So Now What | The Shins Listen Live
 
 
< Back to front page Text size +

Friday tidbits

Posted by Robin Abrahams  March 30, 2012 09:50 AM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

I'll post my response to Monday's question later today. In the meantime -- Slate reviews a new book on the history of sex and gender in the office -- sounds like a must for "Mad Men" fans. Or, for that matter, anyone who has ever worked in an office: 

Women first started to take office jobs during the Civil War, and their conspicuous presence prompted both desire and suspicion from men who were used to working only among themselves. Lots of chasing, leering, and pinching ensued. (One idea from 1915 went so far as to suggest installing the stenographer in a wire cage.) At work, some women met the man they would marry, but many did not, and a whole industry of advice-giving sprung up to serve the considerable number who found themselves in situations that were either untenable (e.g. the extramarital affair) or intolerable (e.g. the lecherous boss). 

 *** 

Mr. Improbable is coming home today! From a four-week trip. Should I sing "Zou Bisou Bisou" for him?
 

*** 
I've been doing some redecorating while he was gone. Check out this fun IKEA fabric I got to make kitchen curtains:
julita-fabric__0123558_PE279744_S4.jpeg Isn't that delightful? I found exactly what I wanted in bedding, folding chairs, and textiles. But on the etiquette, ethics, and engineering side, IKEA thoroughly traumatized me. And I wasn't the only one, apparently. A very kind man took me aside at the top of the escalator and explained how you get some things yourself right away, and some things yourself later, and some things other people get for you, and how you are supposed to know which is which, with the clear satisfaction of someone who was paying forward a favor done to him during some terrifying neophyte excursion years ago. There were no salespeople around the fabric center, nor scissors sharp enough to be used by a left-hander, so I had to beg a fellow shopper to cut the above delightful fabric for me. And so on. Whatever tsuris the store's insufficient staff and non-intuitive design caused, though, I was impressed by how kind all the shoppers were to each other. Bostonians really are nice, as long as we know what you need. 

*** 

A friend posted on my Facebook wall: "I dreamed last night that you and Marc started a T-shirt company, and I don't know the name of the company, but for corporate titles, he was Tee-Rex and you were Tee-Regina, and you were both very pleased with yourselves."
This blog is not written or edited by Boston.com or the Boston Globe.
The author is solely responsible for the content.

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

 
About Miss Conduct
Welcome to Miss Conduct’s blog, a place where the popular Boston Globe Magazine columnist Robin Abrahams and her readers share etiquette tips, unravel social conundrums, and gossip about social behavior in pop culture and the news. Have a question of your own? Ask Robin using this form or by emailing her at missconduct@globe.com.
contributor

Who is Miss Conduct?

Robin Abrahamswrites the weekly "Miss Conduct" column for The Boston Globe Magazine and is the author of Miss Conduct's Mind over Manners. Robin has a PhD in psychology from Boston University and also works as a research associate at Harvard Business School. Her column is informed by her experience as a theater publicist, organizational-change communications manager, editor, stand-up comedian, and professor of psychology and English. She lives in Cambridge with her husband Marc Abrahams, the founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes, and their socially challenged but charismatic dog, Milo.

Need Advice?

Curious if you should say "bless you" to a sneezing atheist? How to host a dinner party for carbophobes, vegans, and Atkins disciples—all at the same time? The finer points of regifting? Ask it here, or email missconduct@globe.com.

Ask us a question

Required
Required
archives

Browse this blog

by category