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Today's column

Posted by Robin Abrahams  February 2, 2014 09:13 AM

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... is online here. An etiquette dispute between mother and daughter:

Finally, the fact that you and your mother disagree about a particular social courtesy doesn't mean that one of you has to be wrong. In addition to its rules, etiquette offers a vast extra-credit menu of kindnesses to choose from, and different people gravitate to different ways of being thoughtful. (Our generation might not remember to wear a gift when next we see the giver, but we keep track of whose kid is lactose-intolerant and who prefers texting to e-mail and all kinds of other social details that our parents never had to worry about.) When you love someone a lot, though, you choose the extra-credit kindnesses that mean the most to them. The question shouldn't be "Who's right?" It should be "What can I do for you?"
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About Miss Conduct
Welcome to Miss Conduct’s blog, a place where the popular Boston Globe Magazine columnist Robin Abrahams and her readers share etiquette tips, unravel social conundrums, and gossip about social behavior in pop culture and the news. Have a question of your own? Ask Robin using this form or by emailing her at missconduct@globe.com.
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Who is Miss Conduct?

Robin Abrahamswrites the weekly "Miss Conduct" column for The Boston Globe Magazine and is the author of Miss Conduct's Mind over Manners. Robin has a PhD in psychology from Boston University and also works as a research associate at Harvard Business School. Her column is informed by her experience as a theater publicist, organizational-change communications manager, editor, stand-up comedian, and professor of psychology and English. She lives in Cambridge with her husband Marc Abrahams, the founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes, and their socially challenged but charismatic dog, Milo.

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Curious if you should say "bless you" to a sneezing atheist? How to host a dinner party for carbophobes, vegans, and Atkins disciples—all at the same time? The finer points of regifting? Ask it here, or email missconduct@globe.com.

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