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Norman Ramsey, 96; his love of physics led to a Nobel Prize

Norman F. Ramsey developed the hydrogen maser, which led to the cesium atomic clock. Norman F. Ramsey developed the hydrogen maser, which led to the cesium atomic clock. (ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE)
By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff / November 7, 2011

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Dr. Ramsey, of Brookline, won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989. His best-known work involved measuring gradations of atomic energy levels. This system of measurement is known as the separated oscillatory field method. He was a professor of physics emeritus at Harvard. Dr. Ramsey died Friday. Services are private, but a memorial service will be held at Harvard University at a later date.

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