THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Brandon Winston, a smoker, was tested for carbon monoxide levels for a study at the University of California-San Francisco Tobacco Research Center.
(Jakub Mosur/ for the Boston Globe)

Blocking a killer hook

Smoking is linked to one in five US deaths a year. But legal and technological changes are in sight to dramatically reduce nicotine, the addictive property in tobacco products.

By Diedtra Henderson
Globe Staff / July 30, 2007

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WASHINGTON -- Public health advocates are within striking distance of a goal that has eluded them for generations: widespread availability of cigarettes with nicotine levels that are too low to become addictive. (Full article: 1079 words)

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