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Wireless systems are called disruptive

Interference affects medical devices

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Associated Press / June 25, 2008

CHICAGO - Wireless systems used by many hospitals to keep track of medical equipment can cause potentially deadly breakdowns in lifesaving devices such as breathing and dialysis machines, researchers reported yesterday in a study that warned hospitals to conduct safety tests.

Some of the microchip-based "smart" systems are touted as improving patient safety, but a Dutch study of equipment - without the patients - suggests the systems could actually cause harm.

A US patient safety specialist said the study "is of urgent significance" and said hospitals should respond immediately to the "disturbing" results.

The wireless systems send out radio waves that can interfere with equipment such as respirators, external pacemakers, and kidney dialysis machines, according to the study.

Researchers discovered the problem in 123 tests they performed in an intensive-care unit at an Amsterdam hospital.

Patients were not using the equipment at the time.

Electromagnetic glitches occurred in almost 30 percent of the tests when microchip devices similar to those in many types of wireless medical equipment were placed within about a foot of the lifesaving machines.

Nearly 20 percent of the cases involved hazardous malfunctions that would probably harm patients.

These included breathing machines that switched off; mechanical syringe pumps that stopped delivering medication; and external pacemakers, which regulate the heart, that malfunctioned.

The wireless systems are used to tag and keep track of medical equipment like heart-testing machines, joint replacements, and surgical staplers.

They can help quickly locate devices that are elsewhere in the hospital and help prevent theft.

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