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Now Hiring: Troy Browns of the start-up world

Nathan Rothstein writes that early start-up employees must be like Patriots Hall-of-Famer Troy Brown: Capable of greatness, but also of doing the dull, dirty work to get the job done.
Nathan Rothstein writes that early start-up employees must be like Patriots Hall-of-Famer Troy Brown: Capable of greatness, but also of doing the dull, dirty work to get the job done.Matthew J. Lee / Globe File

Last week, I kicked off the Hive’s first start-up jobs roundup (Hiring? Let me know at Hive@Boston.com!). But what is it like to actually work in one of those jobs — or to hire a start-up’s first employee?

Nathan Rothstein, director of marketing for Project Repat, sent over a great blog post detailing how complicated defining the early job responsibilities can be, particularly at a consumer goods startup where the day-to-day can include building partnerships, canvassing potential customers, and stuffing scraps into trash bags.

The job Project Repat is trying to fill, Rothstein writes, is sometimes glamorous, sometimes not, but always interesting.

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”For the football fans out there, we need a Troy Brown,” he wrote. “He started on special teams, became a wide receiver, also led the team in interceptions, and at one point, even played quarterback. Sometimes he got all the glory, sometimes none, but he won two Super Bowls.”

What unexpected duties have you come across as a founder or early start-up employee? And how can you weed out who will work — and who just isn’t cut out to be the Troy Brown of your team? Let me know at michael.morisy@boston.com. I’d love to hear what you’ve seen. And if you think you’re a start-up Troy Brown, check out our job postings or read more about Project Repat’s position.

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