E Ink looks to light up CES consumer-electronics show in Vegas

Twelve24, a Boston based company, introduces ClockONE, an ultrathin, meter long clock inspired by the capabilities of E Ink electronic paper displays. Photo was included with Twelve24’s  press release.
Twelve24, a Boston based company, introduces ClockONE, an ultrathin, meter long clock inspired by the capabilities of E Ink electronic paper displays. Photo was included with Twelve24’s press release.

Las Vegas, often a Mecca of antics and unauthorized fun, is now swarming with techies looking for the next great gizmo at International CES, the nation’s largest consumer-electronics show.

One attendee, aside from the Globe’s Hiawatha Bray (as always, the paper’s mission is to put its best geek on the case) --- one attendee at the show is E Ink Holdings, a company with an MIT heritage that developed some of the ink-display technology behind such e-readers as Amazon.com’s Kindle.

Currently, E Ink is looking to expand beyond its core niche of e-readers by diversifying into other markets such as consumer electronics, retail, and digital signage

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Photo included with Faraday Bicycles’ press release.

Several such products using E Ink technology are now on view at CES, the company said. They include a meter-long clock being developed by a Boston firm and an electric bike that features an E Ink display that provides information about the bike’s lithium-ion battery pack.

ClockONE is a product in the works from a Boston-based firm called Twelve24. ClockONE is one meter long and weighs less than four pounds. With a thickness of four millimeters, the ultrathin clock is designed to run for one year on a single coin cell battery. According to Twelve24, ClockOne should become available to consumers later this year. The suggested retail price is $499.

The firm’s press release included a statement from Giovanni Mancini, director of product management for E Ink Holdings.

‘‘ClockONE showcases that E Ink technology can enable designs rather than constrain them,’’ Mancini said.

Meanwhile, Faraday Bicycles, a San Francisco-based company, said it is debuting the production version of the Faraday Porteur electric bike at the E Ink booth during the CES show.

The Porteur was launched on Kickstarter in fall 2012, and after a year in development, Faraday Bicycles will begin shipping its entirely pre-sold first production run in early 2014, the company said in a press release.

According to Faraday Bicycles, the design of this version of the Porteur combines “the speed and exhilaration of a state-of the-art e-bike with the timeless looks of a classic European city bike.” Its suggested retail price: $3,500.

“The Faraday Porteur is in every way first and foremost a bicycle, from the way it looks to the experience of riding it,” Faraday founder and chief executive Adam Vollmer said in a statement. “We chose to use an E Ink display because it lets us clearly convey technical information to the rider without sacrificing Faraday’s ‘retro meets modern’ design philosophy.”

E Ink started as a spin-off from MIT’s Media Lab. In 2009, it was purchased by Taiwanese display maker Prime View International. After the transaction closed, Prime View changed its name to E Ink Holdings. The company currently has 260 Massachusetts employees.