Business

The case of True Religion v. truereligion.com

True Religion Apparel, which sells  $300 jeans, wants a similarly named website shut.
True Religion Apparel, which sells $300 jeans, wants a similarly named website shut.

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Ibrahim Ali Ibrahim Abu-Harb is a devout Muslim who says he decided to express his devotion to Islam by launching a web site, www.truereligion.com. True Religion Apparel Inc., a purveyor of $300 jeans, says Abu-Harb’s only devotion is to money and wants the website shut down.

The dispute is in US District Court in Boston and could test the limits of a federal law aimed at stopping speculators from snapping up Internet domains just to sell them back to the companies. True Religion Apparel is suing under that law, the Anti-Cyberquatting Act of 1999, even though Abu-Harb registered the domain name and launched the site years before True Religion Apparel secured its trademark.

The case centers on who is the master of Internet domains.

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