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Millennials have same ‘lifestyle aspirations’ as boomers, Zipcar survey finds

 Zipcar employees posed for photos on Congress St. bridge during a publicity event marking the company's relocation to new headquarters.  File photo:  Colm O'Molloy for The Boston Globe.
Zipcar employees posed for photos on Congress St. bridge during a publicity event marking the company's relocation to new headquarters. File photo: Colm O'Molloy for The Boston Globe.Credit:

“Millennials are closer to their elders in action and ideology than most people think, including the respondents themselves.”

That’s one finding from a new survey conducted by the Boston vehicle-sharing company Zipcar Inc., which surveyed 1,009 adults in the US to gauge their attitudes about technology and lifestyle choices. (For the purposes of this online survey, Zipcar defined a millennial as a person between the ages of 18 and 34.)

One survey question: Is your idea of a dream home a house in the suburbs or a pied-a-terre in a vibrant urban neighborhood?

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“Nearly one in five Millennials (18 percent) say that their American Dream includes a home in the city with easy access to amenities, whereas nearly 30 percent of those older than 55 prefer that option,” Zipcar said in a press release.

There was one question, though, where the generations broke sharply. In paraphrased form, the question basically asked: What would mess up your life more? Losing your car? Or losing your smartphone?

Nearly 40 percent of millennials answered that losing a smartphone would be more devastating than being car-free pedestrian. Only 16 percent of respondents aged 35 or older indicated that losing their smartphone would be worse than losing their car, Zipcar said.

One survey finding might be of particular relevance to Zipcar, which regards millennials as an important customer demographic.

“More than half of Millennials (53 percent) claim that high costs of maintenance, parking, and gas make it difficult for them to own a car, while only 35 percent of older generations feel the same,” Zipcar said.

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