Uber, one of the most prominent ride-requesting apps, on a cell phone in Sydney, Nov. 29, 2012. Uber, a company being sued by some San Francisco cabdrivers and Chicago car services, says the laws holding it back are anti-competitive. (Jack Atley/The New York Times)
Uber is one of the most prominent ride-requesting apps. (Jack Atley/The New York Times)
NYT

If you’re trying to get from Boston to New York City, you’ve got plenty of travel options. There’s planes, trains, and automobiles, and all for competitive prices. And for most people, that’s a good thing—the lower the price, the easier it is to travel between the two cities.

But what if you’re just itching to spend a fortune? With every mode of travel trying to offer the least expensive trip, how will we ever know which option is the most expensive?

At first glance, the question seems hopeless. But according to a tweet from Upstart CEO Dave Girouard, a hero emerged last week to bring clarity to the situation.

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Uber is your winner! At $1,800, the specialty cab service takes the crown despite not being the most efficient way to make it from the Hub to Manhattan.

In fact, if you wanted to make that journey right now (literally), you could probably find a better price than what this guy paid.

On Friday at 6 p.m., a regular taxi would do the job for $604.55. Amtrak has multiple trains running from South Station to Penn Station for less than $200. Student-friendly bus lines line MegaBus and BoltBus generally don’t run more than $100 (and that’s only if you’re buying last minute). The most expensive flights don’t even crack $1,700. And guess what? Even if you wanted to make the trip by sea, you could pull it off. It would take you six days, but that still only runs you $700 per person and it includes meals!

We can’t be sure who Girouard’s Uber driver had in his backseat last week, but someone should find that man and ask him what he was thinking. It seems like the only way this is even possible is if he went out of his way to find the most expensive trip, making him either stupid rich or, well, just plain stupid.