Chief Executive Osamu Yunoki of GU, the low-priced cousin of the group's better-known Uniqlo brand, poses for a photograph at an opening event of the store at Shibuya shopping and amusement district in Tokyo June 17, 2014. Fast Retailing Co Ltd's fast-fashion GU brand aims to accelerate its overseas expansion, first with a launch in Hong Kong, South Korea and Southeast Asia from next year and then in Western markets within several years, the brand's chief executive said. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: FASHION BUSINESS)
Chief Executive Osamu Yunoki of GU, the low-priced cousin of the group's better-known Uniqlo brand, at a Tokyo location of the chain.
REUTERS

Would you steal clothing from a store?

What if they let you walk out the door without paying for it?

What if they let you wear it home?

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A casualwear chain offshoot of Japanese mega retailer Fast Retailing (who also owns Uniqlo) called GU is trying this method, encouraging their customers to wear their apparel up to three times before deciding whether or not they want the items for good. GU allows customers to pick up three items and test drive them in the real world before handing over that cash money. The policy operates — more or less — as an honor system of sorts, requiring borrowing customers to leave their phone number and name at the store, no photo ID required, according to Kotaku.com.

But why? Apparently most items are so cheap (Kataku says “the most expensive item in the store is the equivalent of around twenty bucks”) so the store isn’t super concerned that their less conscientious customers are going to make out like bandits — not extravagant ones, at least.

h/t Complex