Mexico and Portugal warmed up for the 2014 World Cup with a game at Gillette Stadium in June.
Mexico and Portugal warmed up for the 2014 World Cup with a game at Gillette Stadium in June.
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Two Rhode Island cities are getting in on the fun of imagining a New England Revolution soccer stadium in their limits.

According to Ocean State TV station WPRI, the cities of Providence and Central Falls have both held discussions with the team.

The Revolution is owned by The Kraft Group, which also controls the New England Patriots. The team currently plays in Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, which the Krafts own. However, the Revolution said they’ve been looking to move out for years. The reasons: Gillette is too big for a professional soccer team in the US. And its suburban location puts it out of reach for the young urbanites that are more likely to embrace soccer.

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The team has always said it’s most interested in moving closer to the Boston urban core so as to be along the MBTA. And most recently, Kraft Group President Jonathan Kraft said the team was targeting the City of Boston itself—which came as a little bit of a surprise to fans who have speculated that Somerville or Revere would make the most sense for a stadium.

Fall River, the two cities’ neighbor across the Mass.-Rhode Island border, threw its hat into the ring a couple of years ago. That news amounted to just about nothing.

While Providence is on the commuter rail, neither city offers subway access. So notwithstanding a healthy soccer appetite in Rhode Island, it wouldn’t seem like a particularly likely spot for a projected $130 million stadium. WPRI’s report suggests the two cities have only engaged in the most preliminary of discussions.

Then again, the state does have a penchant for Schill—err, shelling out millions in for sports-related projects.

That’s an easy joke to make, but it’s not entirely for nothing; analysts have suggested the Krafts, who paid for Gillette Stadium while the public paid infrastructure costs, will hope to get at least some public funding for a soccer stadium.