Schilling to Skip R.I. Hearing Due to Health Issues

Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios went bankrupt in 2012.
Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios went bankrupt in 2012.
Steven Senne/AP

Former Red Sox star and would-be video game mogul Curt Schilling will not attend a hearing in Rhode Island today looking into allegations that his failed 38 Studios violated state lobbying laws.

Lawyers for both Schilling and a business associate, who was also expected to appear at the hearing, have asked for a 30-day continuance, The Providence Journal reports, citing health issues Schilling is facing. Schilling announced earlier this year he had been diagnosed with cancer, and later announced he is in remission. However, he is still dealing with the lingering effects of the treatment.

Secretary of State Ralph Mollis’s office is not expected to challenge the request, a spokesperson tells Boston.com.

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Mollis has been investigating whether the company used lobbyists who did not register with the state, as required by law.

In May, Rhode Island news station WPRI uncovered a contract between the company and Michael Corso, an associate of the state’s former House speaker, Gordon Fox. The contract said the company would pay Corso to work with state officials. After WPRI showed Mollis the contract, Mollis told the station: “That doesn’t get any closer to lobbying than the word lobbyist.”

Corso skipped a hearing last week about the alleged violation, objecting to it because the state’s investigation has not been completed, and accusing Mollis of attempting to boost his own political standing with the undertakings.

Schilling’s company went under in 2012 after securing a $75 million taxpayer-backed loan and moving from Massachusetts to Rhode Island two years prior. The size of that debt, now on taxpayers’ hands, has ballooned to close to $90 million with interest, and has been a topic of intense debate in the Rhode Island political scene. The process by which the company secured the loan is also subject to a lawsuit from the state, as well as a separate criminal investigation.