In this Aug. 7, 2014 photo, construction continues on a $225 million project by Penn National Gaming to transform the Plainridge harness racing track into a slot parlor in Plainville, Mass. The company has spent $80 million on the project despite the upcoming November ballot measure whether to repeal the state’s 2011 casino law. (AP Photo/Phil Marcelo)
Construction continues on a $225 million project by Penn National Gaming to transform the Plainridge harness racing track into a slot parlor in Plainville, Mass.
Phil Marcelo/AP

The folks behind the Penn National Gaming slots parlor in Plainville say they have completed the structural shell of the project, State House News reports. Supporters will hold a press conference to celebrate the milestone today. That way, they presumably hope, you might not vote to kill it.

Completion of a shell is probably the sort of thing developers would announce under normal circumstances. But it’s most certainly the kind of thing they’d celebrate—and point enthusiastically toward—while they’re looking head-on at the prospect of the project being declared null in a couple of months. And with that in mind, officials also plan to use the construction milestone as an opportunity to “express their opposition to ballot Question 3” on this November’s ballots.

That referendum question would, of course, wipe out planned gambling developments in Massachusetts. That would include the Plainville project, which was awarded the state’s lone slots parlor license earlier this year and began construction pretty much immediately. The Supreme Judicial Court’s decision to allow the question onto ballots in June didn’t slow development on the Plainridge Park Casino.

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