THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Learning to adjust

For millions of middle-class Americans, the recession has forever changed spending habits and forced a reconsideration of basic expectations — like retirement

Marianne Stravinskas (left) and her partner, Liz Page, have told their daughter, Chloe, she will have to work to help cover college expenses. Marianne Stravinskas (left) and her partner, Liz Page, have told their daughter, Chloe, she will have to work to help cover college expenses. (Essdras M Suarez/Globe Staff)
By Robert Gavin
Globe Staff / November 21, 2010

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

Liz Page’s event planning business, the main support for her family, was in crisis during the recent recession, and survival meant borrowing, draining savings, and cutting household and business expenses. (Full article: 996 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass