Business

Shoppers fret about authenticity of Target e-mails

When Target’s e-mail began circulating, many recipients questioned its authenticity. Above, a store in Watertown.
When Target’s e-mail began circulating, many recipients questioned its authenticity. Above, a store in Watertown.Credit: Steven Senne/Associated Press/File

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NEW YORK — An e-mail sent to the roughly 70 million Target customers who may have been affected by a pre-Christmas data breach is causing panic among those who fear it could be an attempt to victimize them again.

Target says the e-mail, which offers free credit monitoring services to potential victims of the breach, is legitimate. But the company has identified a handful of scammers who are trying to take advantage of the public’s fear and confusion.

Consumers have been on edge since news of the data breach broke last month. And they’ve been warned to be on alert for possible follow-up attacks that could come in the form of phishing e-mails, electronic messages designed to implant malicious software on their computers or draw them to websites that prompt them to enter personal information.

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