Sections
Shortcuts
Business

Traffic radio station prefers humans to high tech

The Internet radio station J4Traffic brings traffic reports straight from the commuters. Drivers call from Route 128, for example, to describe accidents that are slowing down traffic or other causes. There have been safety concerns over listeners who are recording audio reports and uploading them via a smartphone app, potentially in violation of the state law against texting while driving.
The Internet radio station J4Traffic brings traffic reports straight from the commuters. Drivers call from Route 128, for example, to describe accidents that are slowing down traffic or other causes. There have been safety concerns over listeners who are recording audio reports and uploading them via a smartphone app, potentially in violation of the state law against texting while driving.Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff/File 2013

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

In the epic quest to outsmart traffic congestion in Boston, commuters have any number of high-tech weapons: Google Maps and apps such as Inrix and live video from major highways.

Or, you can just tune in to Chad, who is calling in to report that “uh, the lower end of 128 from the triangle up to, um, 138, is OK.”

The latest innovation in traffic reporting relies on an old-fashioned format: a talk-radio-style broadcast in which fellow commuters call in reports from the road.

“The maps used in most traffic reporting show you where there is congestion, but they can’t tell you what is causing that backup,” said founder Todd Feinburg. “Now you can hear what people on the road are experiencing, which can help you make a better decision about your route.”

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Sections
Shortcuts

Share