A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser. REUTERS/Mal Langsdon
A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser. REUTERS/Mal Langsdon
REUTERS/Mal Langsdon

The Department of Homeland Security issued an advisory on Sunday warning Americans not to use Internet Explorer after a dangerous bug was exposed, according to USA Today.

The bug, discovered over the weekend by research firm FireEye, allows for “watering hole” attacks, according to the report. Instead of hunting down individuals using the buggy browser, hackers instead install malicious code on regular websites. If you use the vulnerable browser to view the site, that code then infects the user’s computer.

Tech news site Re/code explained the vulnerability, saying it allows hackers to control your computer.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

It's a remote code execution vulnerability, which in English means a bad guy can make a target computer run software after a successful attack. "The vulnerability may corrupt memory in a way that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code in the context of the current user within Internet Explorer," Microsoft's alert reads. The phrase "arbitrary code" means pretty much any software that the attacker chooses to run.

The bug affects Internet Explorer versions 6 through 11, according to FireEye. If you must continue using the browser, FireEye suggests disabling all Adobe Flash plugins.